About Christopher Wiggins

I'm a bike shop owner, and part time world traveler. I am the author of "The Idiot's Guide to Bike Repair and Maintenance". I like to play the ukulele, and 5 string banjo. I used to be a drummer.

Full Interview

Here is the full interview I did with Greg Kopecky for Slowtwitch.  As with many of these things, I’m sure I didn’t make some of my points as well as I could have.

 

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Greg Kopecky interviews me for Slowtwitch.

I sit down with Greg Kopecky and talk about my store’s past with the triathlon market and the overall state of the bike biz.

 

Testing 1, 2, 3……

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I’ve been trying my hand at the audio visual side of personal/professional blogs.  It’s taken up a bit of time.

I was recently interviewed for a well known forum here in the US.  The participants are made up mostly of triathletes.  I was an interesting choice for a guest, but my store used to cater to a fair number customers who took part in those events.

Should I be able to work out the technicalities, I plan on posting the audio version of this interview.  I was deep in the throes of bronchitis at the time, and I haven’t heard the finished product.  It should be……..interesting.

For all of you here in the states, enjoy the Holiday tomorrow.  I hope you get a bike ride in, and don’t have any pyrotechnic mishaps.

Podcasting (finally)

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There was a time in my life when all I wanted was to be on the radio.  I made that happen at a pretty young age.  By my sophomore year of college I had an actual job at an actual radio station.  It was small town AM radio, but I was doing it (and getting paid which made me a bit of unicorn among my peers).

I ultimately decided to not pursue radio as a career, but sometime in the mid 90’s I discovered podcasting.  It was the very early stages of the medium, but I saw potential.  I sat on the sidelines for years thinking that podcasting was something I would like to do.  Well, I’ve made the commitment and I’m going to give it a go.

The program will be discussions with people that I find interesting.  There will, for obvious reasons, be a strong bicycle component but it will not be the sole focus.

Even though this is a brand new endeavor I hope it sparks constructive conversation, and suggestions.  Links will be posted in the space as the episodes are finished.

Fingers crossed.

Slow Thinking

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Slow thinking is not a new concept.  If you’re anywhere near my age I’m sure you’re familiar with these sayings.

Look before you leap

Engage your brain before you open your mouth

Better to remain silent and thought a fool than open your mouth and remove all doubt.

Sleep on it.

If there are some of these that pertain specifically to the online world I would love to hear them.

I was reacquainted with this concept listening to economist Arnold Kling discuss his book The Three Languages of Politics.

The concept is pretty easy to understand.  Take a bit of time before you speak (or write, or tweet etc.).  How long do you wait?  It’s hard to say.  It could be a breath, a minute, hours or days.  The point is don’t just spout off.  How many disagreements, road rage incidents, or on line “flame wars” could be prevented this way?

Social media is littered with people who could learn from this.

Of course there have been times when I’ve been irritated, or angered by some random post.  I’ve taken to the keyboard and tapped out what I thought was a terribly clever response.  Righteous in my indignation was I.  I did not, however, hit “send”.  I read what I had written.  Then I read it again.  At that point I deleted the post.  It’s quite cathartic.  I recommend you try it.  Go ahead and use all caps!  What I realized was that what I wrote wasn’t going to change anyone’s mind.  It was only going to pull me down into the crevasse of crap that the original poster had created.

As someone who makes a living in the bicycle business, I’m acutely aware of the constant dangers that automobiles (and the drivers that pilot them) pose when I’m riding on city streets.  I have to think that I would, at the very least, feel much safer if the driver that passes too close (always with some choice words) would take a breath and realize that a bicycle is not actually an impediment to their day.  (Staying off phones while driving would actually accomplish a whole lot more, but that’s a different discussion.)

Now I’m quite sure, gentle reader, that none of these things apply to you directly.  Possibly you have a friend that could benefit from this?  We all have that friend.

Here’s to embracing the slow.